Foreclosuregate: Time to Break Up the Too-Big-to-Fail Banks

From Seeking Alpha contributor Ellen Brown:

Looming losses from the mortgage scandal dubbed “foreclosuregate” may qualify as the sort of systemic risk that, under the new financial reform bill, warrants the breakup of the too-big-to-fail banks. The Kanjorski amendment allows federal regulators to pre-emptively break up large financial institutions that — for any reason — pose a threat to US financial or economic stability.

Although downplayed by most media accounts and popular financial analysts, crippling bank losses from foreclosure flaws appear to be imminent and unavoidable. The defects prompting the “RoboSigning Scandal” are not mere technicalities but are inherent to the securitization process. They cannot be cured. This deep-seated fraud is already explicitly outlined in publicly available lawsuits.

There is, however, no need to panic, no need for TARP II, and no need for legislation to further conceal the fraud and push the inevitable failure of the too-big-to-fail banks into the future.

Federal regulators now have the tools to take control and set things right. The Wall Street giants escaped the Volcker Rule, which would have limited their size, and the Brown-Kaufman amendment, which would have broken up the largest six banks outright; but the financial reform bill has us covered. The Kanjorski amendment — which slipped past lobbyists largely unnoticed — allows federal regulators to preemptively break up large financial institutions that pose a threat to US financial or economic stability. …

According to Brian Moynihan, chief executive of Bank of America (BAC), “The amount of work required is a matter of a few weeks. A few weeks we’ll be through the process of double checking the pieces of paper we need to double check.”

“Absurd,” say critics such as Max Gardner III of Shelby, North Carolina. Gardner is considered one of the country’s top consumer bankruptcy attorneys. “This is not an oops. This is not a technical problem. This is not even sloppiness,” he says. The problem is endemic, and its effects will be felt for years. …